Bees declared extinct 30 years ago take to UK skies again – thanks to farmers

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A species of bee declared extinct in the UK almost 30 years ago is flying again – thanks in part to the efforts of farmers. Researchers have been restoring the short-haired bumblebee to Romney Marsh and Dungeness over the past three years, and the results are starting to come in.

Nikki Gammans and her team have travelled to Sweden each year since 2012 to collect around 100 queen bees, transport them back to Britain and, after a two week quarantine period, release them into the flower-rich countryside of Kent.

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Six Reasons Why Good Ventilation is Essential for Greenhouses

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At its most basic level, a greenhouse absorbs sunlight inside the structure, making for warmer growing conditions than those outside. A greenhouse can provide the permaculture gardener with another type of growing environment on their plot, to compliment the natural climatic condition ns and the microclimates they have created. It can help to start new seedling, giving them protection from the elements during their fragile juvenile stages.

A greenhouse can also serve to extend the growing season of plants, giving them a ‘head start’ on spring, before they are planted out. Gardeners can also use the greenhouse conditions to grow species that require warmer conditions than those their plot provides outside (although these are unlikely to be native species so care must be taken to avoid cross-pollination).

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Once A Year, Farmers Go Back To Picking Corn By Hand — For Fun

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Frank Hennenfent is a typical Illinois farmer. At this time of year, he spends countless hours in an air-conditioned, GPS-equipped combine – an enormous machine that can harvest as many as 12 rows of corn at a time.

But in late September, Hennenfent was going back to the basics. He was a top competitor at the 34th annual Illinois State Corn Husking Competition.

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Veganic is the New Permaculture Part 2

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The film shows the wonderful way we can replicate nature growing organically through the use of mainly wood chips. There is a whole detailed process, but the basics of the system is that once we implement such system comprised of mainly, different sizes of wood chips and after several years of tending to the garden, if properly done of course, the garden can maintain itself and not much work, like crop rotation or watering or fertilizing etc. is needed.

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Now appearing: Hemp, for the first time in decades

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A handful of farmers are set to plant the country’s first hemp crop in decades, despite federal regulations that tightly restrict the plant’s cultivation.

Proponents of industrial hemp say it’s one of the most misunderstood plants in the world. It’s related to its far more controversial cousin, marijuana, but lacks the THC that gives marijuana its psychedelic properties. Hemp is grown for its fibers, seeds and oils all over the world, but has been a controlled substance in the U.S. for decades.

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Six Properties of Soil

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The soil is the bedrock of your permaculture site. When the soil changes with time, the plants also adapt to those changes. However, having the knowledge about the structure of your soil will make your planting and soil treatment more effective. The properties of the soil is determined by the material that went into its original manufacture and sometimes agricultural and permaculture practices also have an impact.

These properties are interconnected with each other and changes in one impact the other. All are in an ever-evolving relationship with the plants that are growing in the soil. By understanding the properties, you can make sure that you are planting species that suit the soil conditions.

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Good planning maintains biodiversity on farms

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Farming and native biodiversity are not mutually exclusive. Landscape planning is one approach that lets the two land uses coexist, explains Sue McIntyre.

The 20th century saw a wealth of innovations in agriculture that allowed increased food and fibre production, and with it prosperity. But our society is now realising that the fertilisers, pesticides, machinery and non-native pastures that brought these benefits have produced a corresponding problem for native biodiversity. And that raises the question: What are we going to do about minimising environmental harm? Indeed, what circumstances allow the twin objectives of productivity for human uses and nature conservation to be met?

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